McClelland & Stewart Digital

  • The way most Western politicians talk, democracy is the pinnacle of civilization, the best political system there is. Many think it's the system the rest of the world ought to adopt. Bob Rae is not one of them. He is too well informed about the difficulties and dangers of implanting democracy in foreign lands. Exporting Democracy is an eloquently argued book in which Rae brings his lively, nuanced understanding to bear on the history and current fortunes of this powerful idea. He shows how it and the related ideas of freedom, human rights, and federalism have been pushed to centre stage by the collapse of Soviet communism and by ongoing wars to topple secular and religious dictatorships in the Middle East. He's also witnessed attempts to implant democracy in three countries riven by tribal and ethnic divisions, Iraq, Afghanistan, and Sri Lanka, and offers readers a cool appraisal of the effort.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • Moneyball meets the documentary "The Union: The Business Behind Getting High" in this nonfiction book that explores the culture of cannabis, from its humble beginnings as a textile fiber in 2727 BC, to its illegalization during the Great Depression, to its increasing use as medicinal treatment all culminating in the annual event for marijuana aficionados everywhere: the Cannabis Cup.
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    After spending three years researching his novel Baked, Mark Haskell Smith turns his focus on the one event that intrigued him in the fascinating world of the cannabis culture: the Cannabis Cup competition. What makes a strain of marijuana awardwinning? he wonders. Who would risk everything to grow the good stuff? Is this really a nearly $100 billion a year industry? Alternating between California, the hub of the legalization and decriminalization debate, and Amsterdam, where the world's preeminent cannabis festival takes place each year, Mark discovers a compelling world where science meets agriculture, and hedonism toes the line of criminality.
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    Combining wit, curiosity, and frankness, Heart of Dankness reveals the world of underground botany and outlaw farming, where "strain hunters" risk fines, imprisonment, and reputation to develop amazing weed and, ultimately, battle for the coveted Cannabis Cup, and millions of dollars.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Over forty years ago, Joan Bodger, her husband, and two children went to Britain on a very special family quest. They were seeking the world that they knew and loved through children's books.
    In Winnie-the-Pooh Country, Mrs. Milne showed them the way to "that enchanted place on the top of the Forest [where] a little boy and his Bear will always be playing." In Edinburgh they stood outside Robert Louis Stevenson's childhood home, tilting their heads to talk to a lamplighter who was doing his job. In the Lake District they visited Jemima Puddle-Duck's farm, and Joan sought out crusty Arthur Ransome to talk to him about Swallows and Amazons. They spent several days "messing about in boats" on the River Thames, looking for Toad Hall and other places described by Kenneth Grahame in The Wind in the Willows. Mud and flood kept them from attaining the slopes of Pook's Hill (on Rudyard Kipling's farm), but they scaled the heights of Tintagel. As in all good fairy tales, there were unanswered questions. Did they really find Camelot? Robin Hood, as always, remains elusive.
    One thing is certain. Joan Bodger brings alive again the magic of the stories we love to remember. She persuades us that, like Emily Dickinson, even if we "have never seen a moor," we can imagine "how the heather looks."
    First published in 1965 by Viking in New York, How the Heather Looks has become a prized favorite among knowledgeable lovers of children's literature. Precious, well-thumbed copies have been lent out with caution and reluctance, while new admirers have gone searching in vain for copies to buy second-hand. This handsome reprint, with a new Afterword by Joan Bodger, makes a unique and delightful classic available once more.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • The ten stories in In the Village of Viger portray the life of a rural village as it faces the darkness of its own future. An established milliner, Madame Laroque, is upset by the advent of a younger, more popular rival. An innkeeper's obsession with the Franco-Prussian War drives his descent into madness. A gardener longs to return to the village in France where his mother was born. At once comical, farcical, and tragic, this superb collection, first published in 1896, anticipates later collections of linked short stories including Alice Munro's Who Do You Think You Are? and Margaret Laurence's A Bird in the House.

  • Discover some of Canada's best new writers with this highly acclaimed annual anthology, made possible by the generosity of Pulitzer Prize-winning author James A. Michener.
    For more than two decades, The Journey Prize Stories has been presenting the best short stories published each year by some of Canada's most exciting new writers. Previous contributors -- including such now well-known, bestselling writers as Yann Martel, Elizabeth Hay, Annabel Lyon, Lisa Moore, Heather O'Neill, Pasha Malla, Timothy Taylor, M.G. Vassanji, and Alissa York -- have gone on to win prestigious literary awards and honours, including the Booker Prize, the Giller Prize, the Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize, the Governor General's Award, the Commonwealth Writers' Prize, and CBC's Canada Reads competition. The stories included in the anthology are contenders for the $10,000 Journey Prize, which is made possible by Pulitzer Prize-winning author James A. Michener's donation of Canadian royalties from his novel Journey. The winner will be announced in fall 2011.
    Among the stories this year: In a moving story about faith and the hope for redemption, a trio of strangers keeps vigil in a hospital waiting room for a man who has miraculously survived a fall from twenty-four storeys. A glamorous party provides the backdrop for a monologue – at once deftly comic and uncomfortably familiar – by a wannabe poet desperate to impress. Over the course of a single day, the eldest son of a cattle farmer must contend with new rites and old burdens, in an elemental story of fathers and sons. When a disgruntled employee decides to take measures into her own hands, she is unprepared for the consequences. In a spellbinding postmodern fairy tale, bears, bees, and shrinking humans populate the small world of the fur trader’s daughter, who is more than she appears to be.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • When Woodsmen of the West first appeared in 1908, most readers could not relate to its rendering of the rough edges of logging-camp life. M. Allerdale Grainger refused to sentimentalize the West - he drew from life. While his dramatic and loosely structured tale is at heart a love story, it also tells of what happens when the novel's British narrator encounters a small-time logging operator whose obsession with lumber is matched by his lust for power over other men.
    Today the novel is recognized as marking a significant shift in fiction written in and about the Canadian West. The accuracy of its detail makes it one of the finest examples of local realism in Canadian writing. It is also a fascinating chronicle of conflicting personalities, and of the genius of British Columbia hand-loggers, the culture of camp life, and the intrigues and corruption of the lumber business at the turn of the century.
    The New Canadian Library edition is an unabridged reprint of the original text, complete with the original photographs.
    From the Paperback edition.

  • Updated to 2007, including Canada's war on terrorism.
    Is Canada really "a peaceable kingdom" with "an unmilitary people"? Nonsense, says Desmond Morton. This is a country that has been shaped, divided, and transformed by war -- there is no greater influence in Canadian history, recent or remote.
    From the shrewd tactics of Canada's First Nations to our troubled involvement in Somalia, from the Plains of Abraham to the deserts of Afghanistan, Morton examines our centuries-old relationship to war and its consequences. This updated edition also includes a new chapter on Canada's place in the war on terrorism.
    A Military History of Canada is an engaging and informative chronicle of Canada at war, from one of the country's finest historians.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Most of us know bits and pieces of our history but would like to be more sure of how it all fits together. The trick is to find a history that is so absorbing you will want to read it from beginning to end. With this book, Desmond Morton, one of Canada's most noted and highly respected historians, shows how the choices we can make at the dawn of the 21st century have been shaped by history.
    Morton is keenly aware of the links connecting our present, our past, and our future, and in one compact and engrossing volume he pulls off the remarkable feat of bringing it all together - from the First Nations before the arrival of the Europeans to the failure of the Charlottetown accord and Jean Chretien's third term as prime minister. His acute observations on the Diefenbaker era, the effects of the post-war influx of immigrants, the flag debate, the baby boom, the Trudeau years and the constitutional crisis, the Quebec referendum, and the rise of the Canadian Alliance all provide an invaluable background to understanding the way Canada works today.

  • Rachel Rose follows her award-winning first book with a dazzling, urgent collection of new poems that look unflinchingly at our errors and our longings, in images that range from the disturbing to the spectacular. Anchoring the collection is a rich, unsentimental suite of lyrics on the journey of pregnancy and new motherhood. These poems are humanist, lushly imagined, and compellingly voiced.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Every year, more than two million North Americans experience the trauma of separation and divorce. Now, at last, On Your Own Again provides down-to-earth help for readers seeking to survive a shattered relationship and build a new life.Written in Dr. Anderson's own personable, reassuring voice, this guide explains the four emotional stages undergone during and after separation and gives every reader the feeling, "He's talking about me."
    Dr. Anderson offers compassionate, practical, step-by-step advice. In no-nonsense language, often leavened with humour,he provides tools that can be used by readers male or female, young or middle-aged, straight or gay, in or recently out of a troubled relationship, to help cope with the loss and to speed recovery - so that they may lead rich, rewarding lives on their own again.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • A warm, at times hilarious, yet dark childhood memoir from a bestselling author.
    This memoir recalls the boyhood years of Ontario's future lieutenant-governor, living in a dilapidated old house complete with outdoor toilet and coal oil-lamp lighting. Behind the outrageous stories, larger-than life-characters, and descriptions of the mores of a small village in the heart of Ontario's cottage country are flashes of insight from the perspective of a child that recall the great classic Who has Seen the Wind by W.O. Mitchell.
    But why "a different Muskoka?" Because the boy was a half-breed kid. Visits to his mother's reserve showed him that he was caught between two worlds. His mother's fight with depression flowed from that dilemma. His father -- the book's main character -- was a lovable, white, working class, happy-go-lucky guy who never had any money but who made the best home brew in the village -- and his specialty was raisin wine.
    Like that raisin wine, this unusual book goes down easily and has a kick to it.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • National bestseller and a Globe and Mail Best Book
    A fascinating, larger-than-life character, Davies left a treasure trove of stories about him when he died in 1995 -- expertly arranged here into a revealing portrait.
    From his student days onward, Robertson Davies made a huge impression on those around him. He was so clearly bound for a glorious future that some young friends even carefully preserved his letters. And everyone remembered their encounters with him.
    Later in life, as a world-famous writer, perhaps Canada's pre-eminent man of letters (who "looked like Jehovah"), he attracted people eager to meet him, who also vividly remembered their meetings. So when Val Ross set out in search of people's memories, she was faced with a wonderful embarrassment of riches.
    The one hundred or so contributors here range very widely. There are family memories, of course, and memories from colleagues in the academic world who knew him as a professor and the founding master of Massey College at the University of Toronto.
    Predictably, there are other major writers like Margaret Atwood and John Irving. Less predictably, there are people from the world of Hollywood, such as Norman Jewison and David Cronenberg (who remembers Davies on-set, peering through a camera lens as he researched his newest novel). And we even hear from his barber, and from his gardener, Theo Henkenhaf.
    Some speakers contribute just a lively paragraph; others several pages. Yet all of them, through the magic of Val Ross's art, help to create an intriguing, full-colour portrait of a complex man beloved by millions of readers around the world.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • National bestseller
    Paul Martin was the Prime Minister we never really knew -- in this memoir he emerges as a fascinating flesh and blood man, still working hard to make a better world.
    "The next thing you know, I was in a jail cell." (Chapter 2)
    "From the moment I flipped his truck on the road home to Morinville..." (Chapter 3)
    "When I came back into Aquin's headquarters I had a broken nose." (Chapter 4)
    These are not lines that you expect in a prime ministerial memoir. But Paul Martin -- who led the country from 2003 to 2006 -- is full of surprises, and his book will reveal a very different man from the prime minister who had such a rough ride in the wake of the sponsorship scandal.
    Although he grew up in Windsor and Ottawa as the son of the legendary Cabinet Minister Paul Martin, politics was not in his blood. As a kid he loved sports, and had summer jobs as a deckhand or a roustabout. As a young man he plunged into family life, and into the business world. After his years as a "corporate firefighter" for Power Corporation came the excitement of acquiring Canada Steamship Lines in Canada's largest ever leveraged buy-out, "the most audacious gamble of my life."
    In 1988, however, he became a Liberal M.P., ran for the leadership in 1990 and in 1993 became Jean Chrétien's minister of finance, with the country in a deep hole. The story of his years as perhaps our best finance minister ever leads to his account of the revolt against Chrétien, and his time in office.
    Great events and world figures stud this book, which is firm but polite as it sets the record straight, and is full of wry humour and self-deprecating stories. Far from ending with his defeat in 2006, the book deals with his continuing passions, such as Canada's aboriginals and the problems of Africa.
    This is an idealistic, interesting book that reveals the Paul Martin we never knew. It's a pleasure to meet him.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • This book shines a light of devastating clarity on French-Canadian society in the 1930s and 1940s, when young elites were raised to be pro-fascist, and democratic and liberal were terms of criticism. The model leaders to be admired were good Catholic dictators like Mussolini, Salazar in Portugal, Franco in Spain, and especially Pétain, collaborator with the Nazis in Vichy France. There were even demonstrations against Jews who were demonstrating against what the Nazis were doing in Germany.
    Trudeau, far from being the rebel that other biographers have claimed, embraced this ideology. At his elite school, Brébeuf, he was a model student, the editor of the school magazine, and admired by the staff and his fellow students. But the fascist ideas and the people he admired - even when the war was going on, as late as 1944 - included extremists so terrible that at the war's end they were shot. And then there's his manifesto and his plan to stage a revolution against les Anglais.
    This is astonishing material - and it's all demonstrably true - based on personal papers of Trudeau that the authors were allowed to access after his death.What they have found has astounded and distressed them, but they both agree that the truth must be published.
    Translated from the forthcoming French edition by William Johnson, this explosive book is sure to hit the headlines.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • A ringing manifesto for change from Canada's Green Party leader and Activist.
    We Canadians are waking up from our long political slumber to realize that there will not be change unless we insist upon it. We have a presidential-style prime minister without the checks and balances of either the US or the Canadian systems. Attack ads run constantly, backbenchers and cabinet ministers alike are muzzled, committees are deadlocked, and civility has disappeared from the House of Commons. In Losing Confidence, Elizabeth May outlines these and other problems of our political system, and offers inspiring solutions to the dilemmas we face.
    "We no longer behead people in Canada, but Stephen Harper's coup d'état cannot be allowed to stand, not least because of the precedent. Any future government can now slip the leash of democracy in the same way. This is how constitutions fail." - Ronald Wright
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • - Is there really such a thing as a blue moon?
    - What time is it at the North Pole?
    - Why don't woodpeckers get concussed?
    - Why don't snorers wake themselves with the racket they make?
    - Do insects sleep?
    These are just a few of the intriguing questions asked and answered in The Quirks & Quarks Question Book, the first question and answer book to come out of CBC Radio's enormously popular weekly science program. Quirks & Quarks producers have combed through ten years' worth of archives to find the most puzzling questions - or the most fascinating answers to apparently simple questions - from the program's Question of the Week segment or its once-a-season all-question show. The scientists and researchers with the answers (many of whom updated their answers for the book in light of new research findings) come from all scientific disciplines and all parts of the country. What they have in common is their ability to explain serious, complicated science in layman's terms. This isn't science made simple, but science made understandable.
    Introduced by the program's host for the past ten years, the genial and ever-curious Bob McDonald, The Quirks & Quarks Question Book has the answers to questions you may never have thought to ask (why does Uranus spin on a different axis from all the other planets in our solar system?) or have spent idle time wondering about (why is there a calm before a storm?). Whether you want to know if you can sweat while you swim or what the view would be like if you could travel at the speed of light, or perhaps you just want to peruse the latest scientific thinking on a wide range of topics, The Quirks & Quarks Question Book has the answer.
    Quirks & Quarks has been keeping Canadians up to date on the world of science for more than 25 years. Every week, the program presents the people behind the latest discoveries in the physical and natural sciences. The program also examines the political, social, environmental, and ethical implications of new developments in science and technology. Over its lifetime, Quirks & Quarks has won more than 40 national and international awards for science journalism.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Trevor Herriot’s memoir and history of the Qu’Appelle River Valley has won the CBA Libris Award for First-Time Author, the Writers’ Trust Drainie-Taylor Biography Prize, the Saskatchewan Book of the Year Award, and the Regina Book Award, and was shortlisted for the Governor General’s Award for Non-fiction.

  • Terry Fox, the one-legged runner from Port Coquitlam, British Columbia, made an indelible impression upon people across Canada and around the world. An outstanding athlete with a stubborn and competitive spirit, he lost his leg to cancer at 19, but said "nobody is ever going to call me a quitter."
    On April 12, 1980, Terry Fox set out from St. John's, Newfoundland to begin the run across Canada that he named the Marathon of Hope. His ambition was to raise a million dollars for cancer research. It wasn't easy. Initial support from communities varied from terrific to nothing at all. His prosthetic leg was painful to run on, and there were always traffic and extreme weather conditions to deal with. But, by the time he reached Ontario - a journey of more than 3,000 kilometres - word of his achievement had spread, and thousands cheered him and followed his progress. Terry's spirits soared, and now he hoped to raise $22 million dollars - one dollar for every Canadian. He succeeded in this ambition, but the Marathon of Hope ended near Thunder Bay, Ontario on September 1, 1980. The cancer had spread to his lungs, and, after running 24 miles in one day, on the next he could run no further.
    When cancer finally claimed his life in 1981, Canada mourned the loss of a hero, but the Terry Fox Marathon of Hope lives on. The Terry Fox Foundation raised more than $17 million in 1999, and support for the event nationally and around the world is growing.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • For how much longer can Canada expect to get a free ride?
    With 9/11 and the international "war on terrorism," the time has come to ask some hard questions. Should we continue to starve our military, reduce our humanitarian assistance, dilute our diplomacy, and absent ourselves from global intelligence-gathering? Can we expect to sit at the global table by virtue of our economic power without pursuing a foreign policy worthy of our history, geography, and diversity?
    Canada has been getting by on the cheap, writes Andrew Cohen in this timely, forceful, and insightful new book. Our reluctance to pay our own way has had a cost: it has eroded the pillars of our international stature. We are still trading on the reputation this country built two generations ago, but it is a reputation we no longer deserve. We claim to be engaged abroad, but for too long we have been a freeloader, trying to do the same for less, practising pinch-penny diplomacy and foreign policy on the cheap. Our capacity in these key areas has become glaringly inadequate, and now that weakness is compromising our ability to honour our traditional commitments overseas.
    The time is ripe for a thorough re-examination of our foreign policy, to affirm our values, to win the respect of our allies, to carry our weight.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • The wildest seven years in the history of hockey
    The Rebel League celebrates the good, the bad, and the ugly of the fabled WHA. It is filled with hilarious anecdotes, behind the scenes dealing, and simply great hockey. It tells the story of Bobby Hull's astonishing million-dollar signing, which helped launch the league, and how he lost his toupee in an on-ice scrap.It explains how a team of naked Birmingham Bulls ended up in an arena concourse spoiling for a brawl. How the Oilers had to smuggle fugitive forward Frankie "Seldom" Beaton out of their dressing room in an equipment bag. And how Mark Howe sometimes forgot not to yell "Dad!" when he called for his teammate father, Gordie, to pass. There's the making of Slap Shot, that classic of modern cinema, and the making of the virtuoso line of Hull, Anders Hedberg, and Ulf Nilsson.
    It began as the moneymaking scheme of two California lawyers. They didn't know much about hockey, but they sure knew how to shake things up. The upstart WHA introduced to the world 27 new hockey franchises, a trail of bounced cheques, fractious lawsuits, and folded teams. It introduced the crackpots, goons, and crazies that are so well remembered as the league's bizarre legacy.
    But the hit-and-miss league was much more than a travelling circus of the weird and wonderful. It was the vanguard that drove hockey into the modern age. It ended the NHL's monopoly, freed players from the reserve clause, ushered in the 18-year-old draft, moved the game into the Sun Belt, and put European players on the ice in numbers previously unimagined.
    The rebel league of the WHA gave shining stars their big-league debut and others their swan song, and provided high-octane fuel for some spectacular flameouts. By the end of its seven years, there were just six teams left standing, four of which - the Winnipeg Jets, Quebec Nordiques, Edmonton Oilers, and Hartford Whalers - would wind up in the expanded NHL.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • Set in the Saskatchewan prairies during the Depression, Why Shoot the Teacher is the Canadian classic that tells the story of a young man’s first collision with reality: an ill-paid teaching assignment in an isolated country school. This autobiographical novel is riotous, grim, candid, and infinitely entertaining. While it is perhaps Braithwaite’s best-loved book, it is also a vivid evocation of the Dust Bowl desolation wrought by the “Dirty Thirties” on the Saskatchewan Prairies, the ordeal of youth among a people bereft of pity and charity, and the human compassion that adds warmth and poignancy to an unforgettable story.

  • Charles Ritchie's first volume of diaries, The Siren Years, created a sensation when it was published in 1974. Besides winning the Governor General's Award for Non-fiction, it was hailed by reviewers on both sides of the Atlantic. An Appetite for Life, his second volume, first published in 1977, deals with his youth in Halifax and his career at Oxford - the years when Charles Ritchie turned from a callow, blundering youth into a callow, blundering young man.
    As these diaries show, Charles Ritchie had a sharp eye, a keen ear, a highly developed sense of the absurd, and - despite his unhappy knack of landing ?at on his face - a thorough "appetite for life."
    This is not only a hilariously funny book, but it presents a vivid picture of two worlds - Halifax and Oxford in the mid-twenties - that are now long gone. It also introduces us to an astonishing range of characters, but the most astonishing of all is the young Charles Ritchie himself.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • In this book, Charles Ritchie looks back at some of the characters that peopled his childhood and youth, in the years before his brilliant career in Canada's diplomatic corps began. In these essays we are introduced to his uncles, Harry "Bimbash" Stewart and the dashing, doomed Charlie Stewart; to his indomitable mother; to his mad cousin Gerald; to the newspaper tycoon Lord Beaverbrook; to his college friend Billy Coster, who threw away wealth and a secure future; and to a host of others. With his usual unerring eye and elegant prose, Charles Ritchie brings them all to life again, with affection and wit.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Edited by Canada's premiere commentator on global affairs, this must-read for political junkies will show the quailty of M&S's new Signal imprint: for everyone who wants to be well informed about international relations and the nature of the diplomacy in the age of Wikileaks.
    Inspired by Allan Gotlieb's capacity to reshape diplomacy for the times, the contributors to this volume grapple with the challenges of a digital age where information is everywhere and confidentiality is almost nowhere. With an introductory essay by renowned political scholar, writer, and commentator, Janice Gross Stein, the work is divided into 4 sections: Diplomacy with the United States in the Era of Wikileaks; The Professional Diplomat on Facebook; Personal Diplomacy in the Age of Twitter; and Where is Headquarters? Contributors include professional diplomats, award-winning journalist Andrew Cohen, former Globe and Mail editor and author Ed Greenspon, and Allan Gotlieb's wife and partner in 'social diplomacy', Sondra Gotlieb.
    From the Hardcover edition.

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