Weedon Grossmith

  • Le personnage principal de ce Journal est Mr Charles Pooter. C'est un employé modèle d'une firme de la City avec ses gaucheries, ses susceptibilités, ses admirations naïves, ses indignations, ses scrupules, ses gaffes, sa modestie, son désir de bien faire, son respect des hiérarchies et son sens de la dignité. Quoiqu'il nous soit décrit des situations souvent absurdes ou ridicules, il s'efforce néanmoins, de façon maladroite mais ô combien touchante, d'agir en toutes circonstances selon son éducation et avec une scrupuleuse honnêteté.
    À l'instar des personnages de Dickens ou de Robert Walser, Charles Pooter appartient à la classe des gens d'en bas, ceux dont la vocation est de regarder avec admiration, mais sans envie, le monde d'en haut. Car le sel de la terre, contrairement à l'opinion romantique, n'est pas le héros, le roi, le prophète, le révolutionnaire, bref, le grand homme porteur de foudres et de tempêtes, c'est le petit, le tout petit bourgeois qui, rentré de son bureau, le soir, enfile ses pantoufles et débouche une bouteille de porto achetée chez l'épicier du coin pour fêter une augmentation de salaire.
    C'est pourquoi Le Journal d'un homme sans importance se lit non pas comme un livre ordinaire, mais comme un évangile - livre d'un dieu ordinaire à l'usage d'hommes ordinaires.
    Les frères George (1847-1912) et Weedon (1854-1919) Grossmith étaient acteurs, compositeurs, chanteurs et écrivains anglais. Jouissant d'une grande notoriété dans le monde du spectacle londonien, ils sont passés à la postérité en publiant (et illustrant) leur Journal d'un homme sans importance publié dans la revue Punch.

  • To mark the publication of Stop What You're Doing and Read This!, a collection of essays celebrating reading, Vintage Classics are releasing 12 limited edition themed ebook 'bundles', to tempt readers to discover and rediscover great books.



    THE DIARY OF A NOBODY Mr Charles Pooter is a respectable man. He has just moved into a very desirable home in Holloway with his dear wife Carrie, from where he commutes to his job of valued clerk at a reputable bank in the City. Unfortunately neither his dear friends Mr Cummings and Mr Gowing, nor the butcher, the greengrocer's boy, nor the Lord Mayor seem to recognise Mr Pooter's innate gentility, and his disappointing son Lupin has gone and got himself involved with a most unsuitable fiancee...

    George and Weedon Grossmith's comic novel, perfectly illustrated by Weedon, is a glorious, affectionate caricature of the English middle-class at the end of nineteenth century.





    THREE MEN IN A BOAT ILLUSTRATED BY VIC REEVES What could be more relaxing than a refreshing holiday on the river with your two best friends and faithful canine companion, Montmorency? However, as J. discovers, there is more to life on the waves than meets the eye - including navigational challenges, culinary disasters, and heroic battles with swans, kettles and tins of pineapple. Jerome K. Jerome's delightful novel has kept readers smiling for years and his prose has found a perfect partner in Vic Reeves's glorious and witty illustrations.

  • Mr Charles Pooter is a respectable man. He has just moved into a very desirable home in Holloway with his dear wife Carrie, from where he commutes to his job of valued clerk at a reputable bank in the City. Unfortunately neither his dear friends Mr Cummings and Mr Gowing, nor the butcher, the greengrocer's boy and the Lord Mayor seem to recognise Mr Pooter's innate gentility, and his disappointing son Lupin has gone and got himself involved with a most unsuitable fiancee...

    George and Weedon Grossmith's comic novel, perfectly illustrated by Weedon, is a glorious, affectionate caricature of the English middle-class at the end of nineteenth century.

  • THE DIARY OF A NOBODY began as a serial in Punch and the book which followed in 1892 has never been out of print. The Grossmith brothers not only created an immortal comic character but produced a clever satire of their society. Mr Pooter is an office clerk and upright family man in a dull 1880s suburb. His diary is a wonderful portrait of the class system and the inherent snobbishness of the suburban middle classes. It sends up contemporary crazes for Aestheticism, spiritualism and bicycling, as well as the fashion for publishing diaries by anybody and everybody.

  • `Why should I not publish my diary? I have often seen reminiscences of people I have never even heard of, and I fail to see - because I do not happen to be a `Somebody' - why my diary should not be interesting.' The Diary of a Nobody (1892) created a cultural icon, an English archetype. Anxious, accident-prone, occasionally waspish, Charles Pooter has come to be seen as the epitome of English suburban life. His diary chronicles encounters with difficult tradesmen, the delights of home improvements, small parties, minor embarrassments, and problems with his troublesome son. The suburban world he inhabits is hilariously and painfully familiar in its small-mindedness and its essential decency.
    Both celebration and critique, The Diary of a Nobody has often been imitated, but never bettered. This edition features Weedon Grossmith's hilarious illustrations and is complemented by an enjoyable introduction discussing the book's social background and suburban fiction as a genre.
    ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

  • Mr Charles Pooter is a respectable man. He has just moved into a very desirable home in Holloway with his dear wife Carrie, from where he commutes to his job of valued clerk at a reputable bank in the City. Unfortunately neither his dear friends Mr Cummings and Mr Gowing, nor the butcher, the greengrocer's boy and the Lord Mayor seem to recognise Mr Pooter's innate gentility, and his disappointing son Lupin has gone and got himself involved with a most unsuitable fiancee...



    George and Weedon Grossmith's comic novel, perfectly illustrated by Weedon, is a glorious, affectionate caricature of the English middle-class at the end of nineteenth century.

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